Liza O. - Seeking Work in New York
Liza O. - Seeking Work in New York

Liza a Nanny for Hire in New York, NY 10128

22.85
start: Nov 25, 2011
< 1 yr experience
full-time
live-in
special needs
driver’s license
car
English
infant care
toddler care
preschooler care

Gender Female

Age 33

Experience 4 years nanny 10+ years babysitting

Skills Drivers License Car Swim

Can care for Disabilities Behavioral Issues Twins/Multiples

Availability Start Date Is Flexible

Position duration Permanent / Full-time, Permanent / Part-time

Would prefer to Either Live-in or Live-out

Preferred states NY


I’m a nanny because I would like to become a nanny because of my love for children. I love giving children the attention they deserve and helping them meet developmental milestones, become emotionally intelligent, independent thinkers and problem solvers, and overall providing them with a positive role model.


My past childcare experience I have worked with children in many capacities including as a preschool teacher, childcare provider, live-in nanny, tutor, horseback riding instructor, case manager, occupational and hippotherapy assistant, camp counselor, and more.


Additional comments - Teaching Philosophy - Students are just like scientists as they are constantly seeking knowledge, developing theories and becoming very inquisitive about the world around them. As a teacher it is my task to help inquiring students build a foundation of knowledge. My approach to this task is based on my belief in differentiated instruction, constructivist teaching and inquiry-based learning, along with three core values- courage, respect, and positive relationships. Differentiated instruction involves providing different paths for students to acquire knowledge, while reaching a common goal. Differentiation is proactive where the teacher plans a lesson in advance by varying the content, process and product of the assignment. Differentiated instruction focuses on the diverse student learning needs by using a variety of instructional strategies including tiered lessons, learning stations, buddy learning, flexible skills grouping, adjusted questions including higher order thinking, and problem based learning. The students’ needs drive the instructional planning, instead of the textbook, curriculum, or teacher. Differentiation involves giving students responsibly for their own learning, which includes becoming self-directed learners. This will not only help classroom management, it will also help learners become more independent and ready for the “real-world”. Through differentiated instruction, all students are actively engaged in activities that pertain to their specific learning needs, strengths and preferences. Taking a constructivist approach to teaching means I believe students are not blank slates when they enter a classroom. Instead, they have previous knowledge and understandings from prior experiences. As an educator, I intend to build on those prior experiences as the students become more knowledgeable. Students may also hold various misconceptions about a particular topic. Therefore, as part of my instruction, these misconceptions will be addressed and clarified through student exploration and discovery. As a constructivist teacher, I believe in teaching through real world applications that have relevance to the students’ lives. It is necessary to focus on building student knowledge of concepts through inquiry-based instruction, not by the citing of facts. As the students shape themselves to become intelligent individuals, they need to acquire enduring understandings and life-long skills related to a variety of topics. Inquiry-based instruction is when the teacher acts like a facilitator and the students play a main role in mediating and controlling their own learning; students are self-directed learners. The role of the educator in this teaching methodology is to scaffold and coach students when necessary. It is one of my goals to help make sense of the world for the students by helping them find connections between experiences, patterns and explanations, rather than simply teaching definitions, separated facts, or diagrams. Through this constructivist teaching approach, students are able to initiate their own learning, while the teacher sustains and guides them. To educate students through constructivism, they need to have courage. Learning is a high-risk endeavor and can be challenging and difficult at times. It is not easy to try something new or to practice something you are not good at yet, especially in front of others who may be more experienced and proficient at the same skill or task. However, in order to grow and become an educated individual, it is necessary to have the courage to learn new skills and practice them until proficiency is obtained. Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing which you think you cannot do.” A classroom environment that promotes courageous learners is one where inquiry-based instruction can occur and students can become self-directed learners. In order to teach students in a productive environment, a level of respect needs to be sustained in the classroom. Respect is a quality which needs to be earned by all of the students, parents and colleagues. As Albert Einstein said, “Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach.” In the classroom, I model respect by treating students with the same consideration that I expect them to have for others. I respect that all the students learn at different paces and in difference manners. Students are not rushed to complete their work and a variety of teaching techniques are used to accommodate the students’ many needs. Auditory materials, visual materials, and manipulative materials are consistently used to aid a variety of learning styles. In return, I expect the students to respect their peers’ needs by not making fun of a learner who may need extra time on an assignment or who may listen to a novel on tape instead of reading silently. Respect needs to be given and received by all individuals in the classroom. A teacher needs to foster positive relationships in the classroom by understanding and connecting to every student. As a teacher, asking the right questions at the appropriate times, praising the suitable amount of success, and actively listening to each student are crucial to foster positive relationships. In turn, the positive relationships will provide a classroom community that is safe and welcoming for all students as they grow and become educated individuals. Being an educator gives me an opportunity to inspire children to learn through exploration and their own discoveries. Creating an effective classroom environment consists of differentiated instruction, inquiry-based instruction, along with courage, respect, and positive relationships. As an educator it is my responsibility to ensure that all the students are learning the necessary curriculum and also establishing life-long skills and enduring understandings about the world around them.


Level of education Other

Languages English

Nationality American